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How to get a better understanding of Skullgirls? (or fighting games in general).

DankleKankle

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Ok, so i’ve got a pretty good understanding of fighting games. I can block mixups well, I can preform specials and relatively short combos, overall i’m at a median in terms of skill. BUT, i’ve been snooping around the threads for a while and one thing i’ve noticed is that people seem to know EXACTLY it is what they’re talking about when it comes to the complex stuff. I’ve been playing fighting games for a while now and albeit I love them, stuff like hitboxes, frame data, and patch notes are stuff that’s always failed to stick with me. I understand what they are and how they’re supposed to work in game, but I have trouble grasping the technical aspect of them… if that makes any sense? I never know what’s objectively good or bad or where a good median is when it comes to frame data and stuff. Someone can say “This move is good/bad” and I never really know WHY. Any advice?
(Sorry, that was a little scrambled. Hard to put into words exactly.)
 
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despeinada

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I'm quite in your same position. I think that the reason it's more personal. By example, a move that is bad is one that can risk a lot and doesn't have too much chance of hitting of something like it. Also, it could be that it doesn't match the use you wanna give to a certain character or variant, or it doesn't fit on what you're looking for. I think it's a more personal question and how you percive your gameplay and gaming style. I still don't know the technicalities of what makes a bad move, bad, objectively talking, but maybe it has to do something with the gameplay of each character.
 
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Stuff

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A move can be bad at something but also good at something for example let's say you want good punish buttons:

Example: You want to punish move X, it's -10 on block but it moves your character back so there's a distance between both characters on block

Move A is 6f of start up but very stubby so even if you can on paper punish you actually can't due to the distance created
Move B is 9f of start up and can reach, it's a tight window but this would be your best punish option.

Move A in this case is kind of bad (but would be good elsewhere)

Example: You want to be safe relative to a certain character and that character's fastest move is 10f

You'd look for whatever button is -9 or something since even though it has a minus on it, you're still relatively safe [albeit at a disadvantage] from this character and these would be your good options against that character, obv you'd still want to end on a move that's less minus but you would know that you're relatively safe against that character. This would change character to character based on how fast that character's buttons are or how far apart you can press that button to still maintain relative safety.

But what if a button is -20 that would be unsafe in this example however the other things that matters is how far apart you are from the other character because -20 might not be a big deal if their 10f attack isn't something that could close the gap and then punish you.

The thing is a move will always be good or bad relative to the context that the tool is put in so it always depends on the context

Idk if this helps fighting games are often very context heavy so it can be hard to explain.

Another context would be in the case of a invincible move such as a DP or a flashkick, traditionally you use these for a way out of pressure and commonly unsafe if blocked.

Let's say you have a DP but it's very slow, small, and easy to punish, this would be a DP that's really bad at its job so it'd be classified as bad.

It all depends on context, something is usually bad if it doesn't help in any context.
 
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DankleKankle

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It all depends on context, something is usually bad if it doesn't help in any context.
Ok, that makes a lot more sense, thanks! I didn’t really think about moves being good depending on the scenarios they’re in. Honestly I think once I play the game a bit more i’ll start figuring stuff out.
 
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Nuuance

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There’s definitely a grey area when it comes to what’s good but also there’s usually a pretty noticeable area of moves that are objectively more good than bad. Response above pretty much said it all

Apart from that it's moreso about patience & predictability. The longer you play usually that starts to fall off...so try to have a couple gameplans when certain moves arent working, then cycle back to moves you might have stopped using. The more niche ones fit that role because while people look for them out of habit, sticking them in once a game or 3 can be very effective. Sometimes just the threat, even if whiffed can be good enough to make people move awkwardly. Think moves like tremolo...very niche, narrow window of use...but it happens once or twice.

Certain moves are good for punishing, others coming out basically when you press the button effectively speaking, then the slower moves you really gotta time/practice with for reads or when opponent moves suddenly or suddenly stays still. Those moves catching people in transition (standing still or about to move) are some of the hardest to get down because it requires you to recognize where the opponent likes to congregate on screen & their movement patterns. Easier said than done, but think of your moves like a kit in an rpg. You have moves moreso for defense (when youre backing up/standing your ground) then offense (pushing to corner/moving forward). You'll notice overlap and some are almost exclusive to one of the two. For characters like squigly, she has more defensive/transition-catching moves for specials & divekick is her main offensive skill. Seria cancelling overlapping both offensive/defensive use. (Usually) The kit with the most moves is where you wanna lean to get conversions to get on offense.

Sidenote, when people get 3/4 of the stage away from you, usually a good time to employ those awkward squigly moves because many characters cant do too much to immediately effect you from there & have no where to go but forward quite literally...so throwing out chord or tremolo is a good bet. obviously watch out for supers & how much meter they have

Find your favorite moves then think about every instance or way you can use them. Once you're able to decide which moves you want to use for what, your time will be far easier & from there you can build on that
 
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DankleKankle

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Find your favorite moves then think about every instance or way you can use them. Once you're able to decide which moves you want to use for what, your time will be far easier & from there you can build on that
Very well said, thank’s for the advice!